Moorlands Primary School

Science updated 24.6.20

  1. Watch the following video clip and note down all the things that you can see that run from electricity. https://www.stem.org.uk/resources/elibrary/resource/30647/things-use-electricity
  2. There were two sources of electricity that we saw in the clip – mains electricity (that we get from plugging items into an electrical socket) and electricity from batteries.  Over the course of one day this week, fill in a Venn Diagram of all the things that you personally use that are powered by electricity.

    This is what a Venn Diagram looks like, remember that it will need labelling.

    Think why there is a section where the two circles intersect (cross each other) and see if you use any appliances that could be written into this middle section.

  3. Watch the following video clip, telling you what electricity ‘creates’ within appliances e.g. heat, movement, light. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/z2882hv/articles/zcwnv9qExtension:  Think of another way of sorting the items you put into your Venn  Diagram, depending on what the electricity is used for. Record this in a way of your choice.  

Science – Electricity Lesson 2

  1. Watch the following clip about how electricity is generated (made). Like the children do, at the end of the video, tell an adult (or write down) what you have learnt from the video.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/primary-science-how-is-electricity-made/zfhfgwx

2. The video mentioned safety around electricity – use the following interactive website to help you to learn more about being safe around electricity in your home.  http://www.switchedonkids.org.uk/electrical-safety-in-your-home

3. Create a poster, designed to tell other children how to be safe around electricity.  Remember that your poster would not be effective if you tried to tell them everything!  So either use the following Success Criteria or create your own.

An effective poster needs:

 

  • Some sort of title, that makes people want to read on.
  • No more than four key facts – chosen carefully for the audience.
  • Writing that is a sensible size to be read from a distance.
  • Correct spelling, punctuation etc.
  • Suitable diagrams.
  • Colour – enough to make the poster attractive, but not so much that it’s distracting.

 

Remember we would love to see your work, so posters could be emailed to your class teacher.